JVDW

Raindrop

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Process

In the preliminary process of the film, Jólan and his team vigorously mapped these forces in a collection of conceptual cartography. The many drawings, from which a fictional territory of elemental geographies emerged, formed the mental realms that would later be materialized as the scenography of the film: apart from the computer animated raindrops, all elements in the film are actually shots of completely ‘analogous’ physical materials, produced by Jólan in his studio and resulting from a year of unlimited experiments with new materials and techniques.

Jólan’s practice has always focused on finding applications for unorthodox materials, like the use of magnetism to gradually grow his Gravity Stools. For him, the idea of making a film offered a completely new way of reflecting on his practice as a designer, giving him an almost endless range of possibilities in the experimentation with new materials – in which Jólan collaborated with a professional film team including Thijs Schreuder Rinnooy Kan (director), Joery Verweij (production designer) and Bas van Bergen (visual effects) to film the resulting material ‘landscapes’. So, more than anything, the film isn’t just an end result, or product; it is used as a tool to open up the possibilities of any given technique or material. All of a sudden, all physical limitations were gone. All materials, techniques, surfaces and textures could be used to create possible subject-matter. Looking back at the project, Journey of a Raindrop proved to be a fruitful new way for Jólan to further extend his experimental design practice.

Process

In the preliminary process of the film, Jólan and his team vigorously mapped these forces in a collection of conceptual cartography. The many drawings, from which a fictional territory of elemental geographies emerged, formed the mental realms that would later be materialized as the scenography of the film: apart from the computer animated raindrops, all elements in the film are actually shots of completely ‘analogous’ physical materials, produced by Jólan in his studio and resulting from a year of unlimited experiments with new materials and techniques.

Jólan’s practice has always focused on finding applications for unorthodox materials, like the use of magnetism to gradually grow his Gravity Stools. For him, the idea of making a film offered a completely new way of reflecting on his practice as a designer, giving him an almost endless range of possibilities in the experimentation with new materials – in which Jólan collaborated with a professional film team including Thijs Schreuder Rinnooy Kan (director), Joery Verweij (production designer) and Bas van Bergen (visual effects) to film the resulting material ‘landscapes’. So, more than anything, the film isn’t just an end result, or product; it is used as a tool to open up the possibilities of any given technique or material. All of a sudden, all physical limitations were gone. All materials, techniques, surfaces and textures could be used to create possible subject-matter. Looking back at the project, Journey of a Raindrop proved to be a fruitful new way for Jólan to further extend his experimental design practice.